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Vol. 74 no. 3, Toronto, Canada, Sept. 1968 






Bible College Campus, Spadina Road, At Night. 



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EDITORIAL 



Our Students 
Demonstrate 



K 



Your Servants, 

For 

Jesus' Sake" 



But they never even made the papers; 
they did not rate a single headline! The 
media of mass communication and infor- 
mation have completely ignored our stu- 
dent demonstration. 

Other institutions rate headlines vi'ith 
demonstrations, student riots, racial strife, 
drug addiction, "student power" groups, 
sit-ins, love-ins, teach-ins, rebellion, march- 
es, placards. Why not Bible College stu- 
dents? 

They certainly demonstrate — but with 
what a difference. 

They demonstrate Purpose in their lives, 
that motivation that leads them to do the 
will of God. And His will is under His 
direction. They are following "History's 
great Revolutionary" and under His ban- 
ner they march, Christian soldiers who 
are involved in something greater than 
a temporary change of scene. They are 
Involved in the Kingdom of God, seeking 
the souls of men and the furtherance of 
the Gospel of Christ. 

This means that in effect they do rebel 
against the average cold, orthodox Chris- 
tian concept of life. They withdraw from 
the world of materialism, affluence and 
self-gratification, in order to serve the One 
Who "though He was rich yet for your 
sakes He became poor, that ye through 
His poverty, might be rich." 

They Ignore the comforts of home and 
go overseas; they forsake all to follow 
Jesus. What a demonstration — of pur- 
pose! 

The news media tell of the use and 
abuse of alcohol, drugs and sex by stu- 
dents today, demonstrating the need, the 
craving for a crutch, a power outside of 
themselves, an experience that helps them 
to forget the past and the future. 

But Christian young people demonstrate 
the Power of God in the life and In the 
heart. 

"He satlfies, joy He supplies. 

Life would be worthless without Him, 

All things In Jesus I find!" 



What a joy it is, to see several hundred 
young people, clean cut, exuberant, pur- 
poseful as they come to Bible College to 
prepare for Christian service. They demon- 
strate that young people don't need L.S.D. 
— for they "have not received the spirit 
of fear, but of power, and of love and of 
a sound mind". 

And our students demonstrate the Pres- 
ence of God. A Bible College in Tennessee 
(Free Will Baptist Bible College) has a 
Student Council of the same caliber of 
those about whom we write. Those young 
people signed this statement, quoted In 
part: 

"We decry open rebellion against the laws 
and government of our country and against 
all constituted authority because God has 
ordained and delegated authority for the 
good of mankind; situation ethics, be- 
cause God's laws are eternally settled and 
ignoring them or defying them furthers the 
degradation of man; the search for real- 
ization of self and purpose through drugs, 
uninhibited self expression, and other use- 
less means, because only when man rec- 
ognizes God for Who He is can he find 
himself and his purpose; the denial of 
God as Creator, Sustainer, and Savior and 
of His laws as settled, right, and just, for 
this denial is basic to all man's rebellion 
and misunderstanding of lite and its pur- 
pose." 

Apart from demonstrations such as we 
have mentioned by Christian young people, 
the present generation of young people 
(half of the world s population) is headed 
for yet more evil days that can only be 
devastating, degrading and demoralizing. 

What a challenge to Christian young 
people to attend Bible College and be 
grounded in the Word; to Faculty and Ad- 
ministrators to serve faithfully and scrip- 
turally; for friends to pray for and support 
an Institution that maintains as the only 
hope for the world, the absolutes and 
moral value of the Scriptures. 
Perhaps you should join such a demon- 
stration! 



The Bible College is not just an academ- 
ic institution, an end in itself. It Is a 
vehicle of service, following the words of 
St. Paul: "ourselves your servants for 
Jesus' sake" (2 Cor. 4:5). Our students 
serve in churches, missions and many 
other areas where they bear faithful Chris- 
tian witness. Our staff serves in churches 
and Sunday Schools. Our Faculty is avail- 
able for a great variety of ministries: 
evangelism, Bible teaching, missions, Chris- 
tian Education, confarences, pulpit supply. 
Indeed any opportunity that the Lord gives 
for serving Him. 

Can we serve you? Can we help in the 
work of your church or your organization? 
Are you planning a missionary conference, 
a series of Bible or Christian Education 
conferences? We want you to know that 
we stand ready to serve you and the 
church of Christ. Remember, this Is your 
Bible College, and we who serve here are 
"your servants for Jesus' sake." 

Please note: If our students can be of 
service, contact the Dean of Students, 
either by phone or writing. 

If the faculty can serve, either contact 
the one of your choice directly (see center 
page spread), or write or call the Director 
of Development. 

Address: 16 Spadina Road, Toronto 4, Ont. 
Phone: 924-7167 



Vol. 74, Number 3, Sept. 1968. 

Editor: Douglas C. Percy 

Published quarterly by Ontario 

Bible College, 14-16 Spadina Rd., 



Toronto, Canada 



Authorized as second class mail, by the 
Post Office Department, Ottawa, and 
for payment of postage In cash, place 
of distribution • — Oshawa, Ont. 



FROM THE PRESIDENT'S DESK 



Plotting the 
Course <^ 



I 



Paul wrote to the Corinthians, "a great 
door and effectual is opened unto me". 
We cannot think of anything that could 
more admirably describe our situation, as 
LCBM and TBC have joined hands to 
serve our wonderful Lord more effectively 
and efficiently. 

To be sure, we could have maintained 
our respective works as in the past, each 
experiencing certain blessings and com- 
pensations along the way. In fact, to have 
carried on with the slogan "business as 
usual", would most certainly have been 
to follow the path of least resistance. 
Change is never easy; hence the natural 
tendency is to become reconciled to the 
status quo. But we were persuaded that 
God was leading us forward; therefore, we 
had no alternative but to follow. His word 
to Joshua seemed so appropriate again — 
"Have not I commanded thee? Be strong 
and of a good courage; be not afraid, 
neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy 
God is with thee whithersoever thou 
goest." 

And so a new chapter has begun. We 
believe that, if the Lord should tarry for 
ten years, our new affiliated College might 
well become the outstanding evangelical 
school in the country. Our main concern 
must always be that we be strong spirit- 
ually. Being a school, we must keep pace 
academically. This goes without saying. 
But, were we to boast a faculty whose 
academic attainments were the finest in 
the land, while at the same time v^e were 
slowly but surely losing our spiritual and 
our missionary zeal and fervency, the 
whole thing would become "as sounding 
brass or a tinkling cymbal". So we repeat, 
above all else we must remain strong 
spiritually. As the Individual is to "grow 
In grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord 
and Saviour Jesus Christ", so must our 
College. 

We expect to be crowded to the doors 
and bursting at the seams during the new 
school year, but in due course the Lord 



will lead us respecting these matters. It 
would be folly for us to formulate plans 
for development of one kind or another at 
this juncture, until we have had ample op- 
portunity to analyze and study the whole 
picture after operations get into full swing. 
Of immediate interest, however, is the fact 
that we have purchased the large double 
house at the south-west corner of Spadina 
and Lowther. This valuable property (24 
and 26 Spadina Road), is to be used as 
a girl's dormitory. It will house some forty- 
five girls, in addition to providing commo- 
dious lounge accommodation. Strategically 
the securing of this property guarantees 
that no large development can thwart our 
future expansion plans should the Lord 
lead us in such a direction. 

Much could be written respecting vari- 
ous aspects of the work, but since others 
will be dealing with these matters in one 
form or another, we shall not unprofitably 
multiply words. We should be remiss, how- 
ever, were we not to stress one very im- 
portant item — FINANCIAL SUPPORT. We 
have observed that, of late, several of the 
strong and worthy evangelical causes have 
been sending out constant and pointed 
pleas for help. It is their contention that 
the more they ask, the more they receive. 
Probably they are right. Certainly they are 
correct in their conclusion that, if God 
is going to help them, it must be through 
His faithful stewards. And each organiza- 
tion must proceed along lines it believes 
will be honouring to God. 

So is it with us. We do not propose to 
change our method of approach essenti- 
ally, for God has honoured it in the past, 
and we have the confidence to believe 
that He will do so in the future. We shall 
continue to furnish pertinent information 
so that God's stewards may be able to 
assess the situation intelligently. We shall 
also emphasize the fact that, if the world 
is to be reached with the gospel of God's 
redeeming grace. Colleges like ours will 
need to be adequately supported, or the 
steady flow of trained workers will dimin- 
ish and die. 

If there is modernism in the pulpit and 
out on the mission field today, it is be- 
cause there was modernism in the semi- 
nary or college. If we want to guard 
against such an unthinkable development, 
we must shoulder the responsibility of 
keeping such a college as this healthy 
and strong. The costs of education are 
fantastic, but our God is able. We, there- 
fore, beseech all who love the Lord and 
His law to stand with us in these dark yet 
momentous days. 



Miss 

Florence Stacey 

Leaves 



For several years, Miss Florence Stacey 
served as House Mother for the women 
students living in residence at T.B.C. At 
the same time, she also served as the 
College nurse, and she fulfilled both tasks 
with the same zeal that she had shown as 
a missionary with Baptist Mid Missions in 
Africa. 

The task of caring for the residence is 
no easy one. To provide a home away 
from home for students, many of whom 
were on their own for the first time, was 
the deep desire of Miss Stacey, and she 
gave herself unstintingly to this end. 

Our sincere thanks go out to her for 
her labour of love in our miost during 
these past few years. And our prayers 
will follow her as she continues to serve 
the Lord Whom she loves so dearly. 



REV. CHARLES A. TIPP 
JOINS FACULTY 

To help meet the increasing demands for 
personnel at the Bible College, the Lord 
has sent Rev. Charles A. Tipp, M.A., B.D., 
to join the faculty and administration. 

Mr. Tipp comes to us well qualified 
academically; he has served 5 years in the 
pastorate; and of late he has been serving 
the Fellowship of Evangelical Baptist 
Churches in Canada as the editor of the 
Evangelical Baptist and as Secretary of the 
Foreign Mission Board of the F.E.B.C. 

Mr. Tipp will assume administrative res- 
ponsibilities as Assistant Drector of Devel- 
opment and will teach in the Department 
of Missions and General Arts. 

We welcome Mr. Tipp to the College, 
and trust that our alumni and friends will 
pray for him in his new responsibilities. 



Keeping On Course 



Dr. William R. Foster, Academic Dean 

Our modern world places a great value 
on education, and a large portion of all 
tax money is designated to provide the 
necessary facilities for education. Some 
Christians would reject education as being 
contrary to the best interests of the spirit- 
ual life. However, it is not education itself 
but the mood of modern education that is 
alarming to the people of God. Modern 
education has no desire to respond to the 
truth of God, but centres rather upon the 
theories of men. Modern education does 
not give to Christ the place of pre-emin- 
ence, but emphasizes man and all his 
attainments. Modern education does not 
revolve about the unchanging word of God, 
but shifts with the prevailing winds of hu- 
man thought. Christian education makes 
the service of God in time and eternity its 
high calling. Unless this mission is fulfilled 
through our educational process, we have 
failed to achieve the true end of education. 

The work of the Church throughout the 
world requires Christian young people who 
are trained to serve efficiently and well. 
The responsibility to provide this training 
is the task of the Bible College. Toronto 
Bible College and London College of Bible 
and Mission have trained thousands of 
young people who are now ministering 
throughout the world in various ways to 
extend the witness of the gospel to those 
who have never heard. 

The development of courses of study for 
the students arises out of the specific 
needs of the Church in its witness. Funda- 
mental and central to this witness is the 
securing of a knowledge of the Word of 
God and of our Christian faith. Each course 
of study has as its core considerable work 
in the areas of Biblical and doctrinal stud- 
ies. Students not only learn what the Bible 
teaches, but how to study the Bible in 
order to find its message, and to make 
the truth relevant in the day in which he 
will minister. Through this comprehensive 
study of the Scriptures the student is en- 
abled to enter into an ever-deepening 
knowledge of God, and to use the Scrip- 
tures for his own growth and enrichment. 
This personal understanding and applica- 
tion of the Scriptures should result in 
effective witness by word and by life. 

Another important part of every course 



of study is the acquiring of a foundational 
understanding of the disciplines of Gen- 
eral Arts. Man and the world are creations 
of God, but tragically they both possess 
the scars of sin. To understand man and 
his problems in the world is an important 
area of our study. In order to minister 
effectively we must learn what man and the 
world are really like. We seek to discover 
this truth in studies such as psychology, 
anthropology, sociology, history, and litera- 
ture. We must also learn what man is 
thinking and doing in order to be an effec- 
tive participant in our modern world. In 
the courses of study students learn what 
ancient and modern men have thought in 
relation to the problems of life. 

As a Christian College we believe that 
all the knowledge which is secured from 
these valuable studies concerning the 
nature of man and his world must be 
evaluated from the perspective of sacred 
Scriptures. The Scriptures will enable us 
to evaluate the Tightness or wrongness of 
the acts and thoughts of men, and to 
order own own thinking and acting in 
accordance with the truth contained there- 
in. We believe that there is truth and 
error, and right and wrong, and that it is 
important to know the truth, and to prac- 
tise the right. 

The third area of each course of study 
is that which is related to the developing 
of the special skills and understanding 
related to various forms of ministry. Our 
students select an area of study which 
will prepare them to engage effectively in 
the work of the Church for which God has 
called them. Students may select studies 
which will prepare them to minister in 
pastoral work, foreign missions, Christian 
education, or sacred music. Each of these 
areas has special skills which must be 
developed. Students receive instruction as 
to the theory behind these skills, and 
spend much time in practice in order that 
the theory may be translated into a skill. 
The student anticipating pastoral work re- 
ceives instruction in sermon development 
and presentation, and is given opportun- 
ity to develop sermons, and to present 
them before his classmates and instruc- 
tors. The student who anticipates working 
in the ministry of sacred music must like- 
wise spend time acquiring the skills which 
ar3 necessary to minister properly and 
effectively as a servant of God. 

The work in the classroom is only one 
aspect of the total preparation of the life 
of the servant of God. Biblical Studies, 
General Arts, and Special Studies provide 
the foundation of understanding for serv- 



ice, but there is also needed a practical 
involvement in the work of the church. 
The Christian Service program offers to 
each student the opportunity for fruitful 
Christian ministry. Through involvement 
with local churches and other agencies 
the student may gain experience in many 
facets of Christian service, develop his 
spiritual gifts and broaden his vision of 
the work of the church. Students are re- 
quired to undertake assignments which 
are related to their academic program and 
vocational goals. Whenever possible these 
assignments are undertaken with the stu- 
dent's local church or denomination. The 
sequence of experiences obtained in Chris- 
tian Service is intended to be progressive 
in nature. A wide range of experience will 
be given during the first two years at Col- 
lege. In the senior years the student will 
be given opportunity to specialize in work 
which is in keeping with his major field of 
study. 

Our basic purpose at Ontario Bible Col- 
lege is well expressed in the familiar 
words of Paul in II Timothy 2:15 — "Give 
diligence to present thyself approved unto 
God, a workman that needeth not to be 
ashamed, handling aright the word of 
truth". The work of education centres 
around the three great areas of concern 
which are mentioned in this verse — God, 
the workman or the student, and the truth. 
The faculty members are the instruments 
that God uses to develop in the students 
an awareness of the proper relationship 
which they should have toward God, and 
a proper appreciation of the place that truth 
has in their lives. To seek the approval 
of God is a worthy goal for any individual, 
and a Christian College should seek to 
encourage each student to develop in 
such a way that God may be pleased. The 
student must be taught to develop proper 
attitudes of mind and heart, a proper pat- 
tern of conduct and life, and proper in- 
volvement in the work of God. Each Chris- 
tian young person that comes to our Col- 
ledge might be likened to a diamond in the 
rough. The hidden possibilities need to be 
discovered, brought out into light, and pol- 
ished. As faculty members we do not al- 
ways perceive at once the potential of life 
that may lay undiscovered in the new stu- 
dent. Our purpose is to discover the spe- 
cial talent that God has given, to create a 
desire to learn, and to encourage a quest 
for excellence. A Christian College seeks 
to develop the full potential of the stu- 
dent's life, and to direct this potential 
ability in such a way that God may be 
pleased with his life and service. 



PLEASE NOTE: 

As of June 1, Toronto Bible College and 
London College of Bible and Missions have 
joined hands and pooled their resources 
in order to do a more effective piece of 
work for God. 

While we expect to operate in due 
course under a new name, Ontario Bible 
College, official confirmation of the change 
will have to await approval by Queen's 
Park. To be sure, such a delay is not 
of our own choosing. However, the re- 
sult could produce the very salutory effect 
of strengthening immeasurably our posi- 
tion in the educational field. In the mean- 
time, wisdom dictates that we refrain from 
using the proposed name. 

Therefore, our friends are asked to ex- 
ercise patience and understanding forbear- 
ance during this period of waiting. 

In the meantime all correspondence, 
gifts and enquiries may be addressed to 
EITHER or BOTH 

Toronto Bible College and 

London College of Bible and Missions 

16 Spadina Road, Toronto 4, Ontario 

S. L. BOEHMER 



Dial-A- 

Thought Ministry 
Continues 



The telephone ministry (920-2222 Tor- 
onto) continues to carry its message to the 
hungry, aching hearts of many in and 
around Toronto. Four telephones are now 
in use, and they are constantly pouring 
the daily message Into the listening ears 
of those who dial the number. 

There are small cards available, listing 
the number for those who might have a 
spiritual need. If you would like to have 
some, call the College and they will be 
sent to you. They can be placed in the 
offices of doctors and dentists, distributed 
to friends or strangers, placed, as some 
have been done so effectively, in laundro- 
mats, and in many other ways have become 
the silent messenger of hope to needy 
people. 

Pray for Dial-a-Thought and its ministry. 



History's Greatest 
Revolutionary 



By William R. Bright 

A few days ago, while visiting one of America's leading universities, I had an opportunity 
to interview a well-known Communist and professing atheist. 

"Who, in your opinion," I asked, "is the most revolutionary person the world has ever 
known? Who has accomplished the most good for mankind through the centuries?" 

From the expression and response it was obvious that such a question had never been 
considered before. After several moments of deliberation, "I guess I would have to say 
Jesus," was the reply. 

Through the years, in many lands, I have asked these questions of knowledgeable 
people of all major religions. Their answers, without exception, have been "Jesus of 
Nazareth." 



One author writes of Jesus, "Nineteen 
centuries have come and gone, and today 
He is the centerpiece of the human race 
and the leader of the column of progress. 

"I am far within the mark when I say 
that all the armies that ever marched, and 
all the navies that were ever built, and all 
the parliaments that ever sat, and all the 
kings that ever reigned, put together have 
not affected the life of man upon this earth 
as has that one solitary life."i 

Wherever the true message of Jesus 
Christ has gone, new life, new hope, new 
purpose for living have been the result. 
Let us consider why, without fear of con- 
tradiction. He can be called "History's 
Greatest Revolutionary." Indeed, every- 
thing about Him was revolutionary: His 
birth, His life. His teachings. His miracles. 
His death. His resurrection. 
Prophecies of His Visit to Earth 
Were Revolutionary 

Jesus of Nazareth was born over 1,960 
years ago. For hundreds of years the 
great prophets of Israel had foretold His 
coming. The Old Testament, which was 
written by many individuals over a period 
of 1,500 years, contains over 300 refer- 
ences concerning Jesus. For hundreds of 
years the scholars of Israel looked forward 
to the coming of their Messiah. For ex- 
ample, over 400 years before His birth, 
the prophet Micah foretold the precise lo- 
cation of that event: "As for you, Bethle- 



hem Ephratah, little as you are among the 
thousands of Judah, from you shall He 
come forth to Me, Who Is to be ruler over 
Israel. His goings forth are from of old, 
from days of eternity. "-' 

Thus, when King Herod inquired of the 
priests and scribes where their Messiah 
was to be born, they replied, "In Bethle- 
hem of Judea: for thus it is written by the 
prophet, 'As for you, Bethlehem Ephra- 
tah . . .'3 

His Birth Was Unique 
And Revolutionary 

Through the centuries man has demand- 
ed signs that would enable him to discern 
what was true. God promised that the 
people could know when the true Son of 
God had appeared; "Therefore the Lord 
Himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a 
virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and 
shall call His name Immanuel."' 

In making his written report concerning 
the life of Jesus, Matthew emphasized the 
revolutionary manner by which the Lord 
Jesus Christ entered into human life: a 
virgin birth."' This supernatural birth set 
the stage for His perfect life of righteous- 
ness before God and man. 
His Childhood Was Revolutionary 

Though little is recorded of the child- 
hood of Jesus, what is known of His early 
years suggests a young life that is without 
parallel in the life of man upon the earth. 

As a boy, during an annual family trip 



to Jerusalem, Jesus slipped away alone 
and went up to the temple. Wtiile there, 
He engaged several learned men in dis- 
cussion, answering their questions and 
challenging their thinking with questions 
of His own. "And all that heard Him were 
astonished at His understanding and an- 
swers. '"^ After three days of diligent 
search, His parents found Him and asked 
for an explanation of His absence. Jesus' 
answer at age 12 announced the very 
purpose for His life upon earth. "How is 
it that ye sought me," He said, "Wist ye 
not that I must be about My Father's busi- 
ness?"'' 
His Teachings Were Revolutionary 

The teachings of Jesus Christ are revol- 
utionary. They are still changing the course 
of events today. Those who listened to 
Him said, "Never man spake like this 
Man."!* He said things that men had never 
thought or spoken before. 

Without question, the greatest teaching 
of Jesus was that salvation comes not by 
what man does for God, but by what God 
does for man through His Son. A group of 
people approached Christ and inquired, 
"What shall we do that we might work the 
works of God?" Jesus replied, "This is 
the work of God, that you believe on Him 
whom He (God) hath sent."" 

Salvation by faith, not works, is revolu- 
tionary because every other religion of the 
world teaches than man is saved (if there 
is a salvation in that particular religion) by 
good deeds. Jesus repeatedly emphasized 
good works, but never as a means to 
salvation. Rather, the Bible teaches, good 
works are produced in us by the Holy 
Spirit after man believes. That is why Paul 
said, "For by grace are ye saved through 
faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the 
gift of God: not of works, lest any man 
should boast. For we are His workman- 
ship, created in Christ Jesus unto good 
works, which God hath before ordained 
that we should walk in them."!" 
His Death and Resurrection 
Were Revolutionary 

Imagine any man predicting accurately 
his own death and resurrection? And yet 
this is exactly what Jesus Christ did. He 
foretold, "The Son of man must suffer 
many things, and be rejected of the elders 
and chief priests and scribes, and be 
slain, and be raised the third day."'- 

Professor Edwin Selwyn, in his work. 
The Approach to Christianity, said, "The 
fact that Christ arose from the dead on 
the third day in full continuity of body and 
soul, and passed into a mode of new re- 
lationships with those who knew Him on 



earth — that fact seems as secure as his- 
torical evidence can make it." 

The death and resurrection of Jesus 
Christ were the message of the revolu- 
tionary New Testament Church. It is a rev- 
olutionary message today. It is a fact of 
history. 

Not only were Jesus' death and resur- 
rection revolutionary, but so was the pur- 
pose for which they occurred. Jesus Christ 
was the only man in all of history who was 
born to die. By dying on the cross for our 
sins. He willingly took upon Himself the 
death that each individual person deserves 
because of sin. It is believing that Jesus 
Christ died for man and by receiving Him 
personally that one becomes a Christian. 
His Miracles Were Revolutionary 

In addition to the revolutionary message 
He proclaimed, Jesus caused the blind to 
see, the deaf to hear, the lame to walk 
and the dead to live, that men would be- 
lieve in Him as the Holy One of God. The 
crowds watched in amazement and said, 
"He does all things well."ii A few weeks 
ago while visiting at the Sea of Galilee, I 
inquired of one of the leading citizens of 
Tiberias, "Do you believe that Jesus fed 
the multitude of 5,000 with five loves and 
two fishes?" "Of course, I believe," he 
replied. 

His influence Through the Centuries 
Has Been Revolutionary 

Moments before Jesus physically as- 
cended into heaven. He issued to His fol- 
lowers the Great Commission: "Go ye 
therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing 
them in the name of the Father, and of 
the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching 
them to observe all things whatsoever I 
have commanded you: and lo, I am with 
you alway, even unto the end of the 
world. "'•■' 

Beginning in Jerusalem, the early Chris- 
tians took His message to the ends of the 
then-known world, so that before 20 years 
had passed, even the enemies of the faith 
admitted, "These that have turned the 
world upside down are come hither 
also."" Like begets like. And history's 
greatest Revolutionary has produced some 
of the most revolutionary men of all time. 

"The Gospel not only converts the indi- 
vidual," writes Samuel Zwemer, "but it 
changes society. On every mission field, 
from the days of William Carey, the mis- 
sionaries have carried a real, social 
gospel. They established standards of hy- 
giene and purity; promoted industry; ele- 
vated womanhood; restrained anti-social 
customs; abolished cannibalism, human 
sacrifice and cruelly; organized famine re- 



lief; checked tribal wars; and changed the 
social structure of society. Paul's gospel 
did the same in the first century for those 
who became the Early Church."'' 

Philip Schaff, well-known historian and 
author of The History of the Christian 
Church, said, "Jesus of Nazareth, without 
money and arms, conquered more millions 
than Alexander, Caesar, Mohammed and 
Napoleon; without science and learning, 
He shed more light on things human and 
divine than all the philosophers and schol- 
ars combined; without the eloquence of 
the school. He spoke words of life such 
as were never spoken before, nor since, 
and produced effects which lie beyond the 
reach of orator or poet. Without writing a 
single line. He has set more pens in mo- 
tion and furnished themes for more ser- 
mons, orations, discussions, than the whole 
army of great men of ancient and modern 
times. Born in a manger and crucified as 
a malefactor, He now controls the des- 
tinies of the civilized world and rules a 
spiritual empire which embraces one-third 
of the inhabitants of the globe." 
His Claims Were Revolutionary 

Jesus claimed to be God. He said, I 
and My Father are one;"!" "He that hath 
seen Me hath seen the Father."'^ Who 
but Jesus would dare to claim, "I am the 
way, the truth and the life. No man cometh 
unto the Father, but by Me"?'' 

Either Jesus of Nazareth was Who He 
claimed to be, the Son of God, the Savior 
of mankind, or He was the greatest im- 
poster the world has ever known. Since 
He has accomplished more good for man- 
kind than any one who has ever lived, if 
His claims are false, a lie has accomplish- 
ed more good than the truth. 

Are you interested in revolution? Do 
you want to help solve the social ills of 
the world? We invite you to join us in 
the Greatest Revolutionary of the Centur- 
ies. He is alive! 

1/"0ne Solitary Life"; 2/Micah 5^2, Berk- 
eley; 3/Matthew 3:4-6, Berkeley; 4/lsaiah 
7:14, King James; S.Matthew 1:18-25; 
6/Luke 2:47, King James; 7/Luke 2:49, 
King James; 8/John 7:46, King James; 
9/John 6:28, 29, King James; 10/Ephe- 
sians 2:8-10, King James; 11 /Mark 7:37, 
King James; 12/Luke 9:22, King James; 
13/Matthew 28:19, 20, King James; 
14/Acts 17:6b, King James; 15/Evangelism 
Today, Message Not Method, Samuel M. 
Zwemer, page 24; 16/John 10:30, King 
James; 17/John 14:9, King James; 18/ 
John 14:6, King James. 
Used by permisssion of Collegiate Chal- 
lenge, Campus Crusade for Christ. 



Peanut Sized 
Preacher 



'I think I'm beginning 

to understand. . . . Going to 

church is something like 

having a night-light!' 




It's a heavy world that rests on the shoul- 
ders of that Peanuts cartoon character, 
round-headed Charlie Brown. But his min- 
iature world is our world, and he has 
spoken for many a beset and bothered 
adult, whose nemesis may not be named 
Lucy, but is nevertheless ever present in 
many different forms and names. 

One day cartoonist (and active Christian) 
Charles Schuiz drew his Peanuts character 
in four panels, the first three showing him 
only giving a series of deep, heavy sighs. 
Downcast and despondent, Charlie feels he 
is alone in the world, although Lucy, his 
nemesis, is put into a corner of the strip 
to remind the reader that she is ever pre- 
sent. She listens as Charlie utters his deep 
sighs. 

Then in a burst of philosophical Insight, 
Charlie blurts out: "I think my soul needs 
a band-aid!" The sermon hits home, for 
who has not felt that depression and dis- 
couragement of heart and soul, and longs 
for a healing touch? The Bible speaks of 
such a condition in Psalm 42; "Why art 



thou cast down, O my soul, and why art 
thou disquieted in me? Hope thou in 
God . . ." 

One day I saw Charlie sitting where I 
often sit, and his experience spoke to me. 
In the cartoon, he is asked the reason why 
he drew his head into his hunched should- 
ers. His reply was: "This is my depressed 
stance. When you're depressed, it makes 
a lot of difference how you stand. The 
worst thing you can do is straighten up 
and hold your head high, because then 
you'll start to feel better. If you're going 
to get any joy out of being depressed, 
you've got to stand like this ..." And he 
scrunched down again. What a lesson! 

Linus, the blanket-bearing character, is 
another favourite fount of "Peanut" wis- 
dom, although his idealism doesn't strike 
fire with Charlie. One day, Linus said to 
his friend: "Look, Charlie Brown, you have 
fears and you have frustrations ... am 
I right?" And then he continues, while 
Charlie merely holds his head in his hands: 
"Of course I'm right. So what you need is 



'We were singing 
"Jesus Loves Me" 
when all of a 
sudden it hit me 
. . . Jesus loves 
me . . . ME . . . 
completely worth- 
less or me!' 




a blanket like mine to soak up those fears 
and frustrations!" To which a woeful Char- 
lie replies with his usual uncertainty: "I 
don't know ... I think most of life's prob- 
lems are too complicated to be solved with 
a spiritual blotter." Indeed they are. But 
we have a 

"Saviour Who can solve every problem. 
The tangles of life can undo; 
There is nothing too hard for Jesus, 
There is nothing that He cannot do." 

Charlie's loneliness is almost conta- 
gious. Wherever he is, and no matter how 
big the crowd, Charlie is alone. One day 
he was eating lunch, alone as usual, and 
was muttering: "I hate lunch hour. Every 
day I sit here on this bench all by myself 
eating a peanut-butter sandwich. Some 
psychiatrists say that people who eat 
peanut-butter sandwiches are lonely . . . 
I believe it . . . When you're real lonely, 
the peanut butter sticks to the roof of 
your mouth." 

In a recent volume, "Two By Fours", 
Charlie Schuiz has expanded his Peanuts 
theme in a series of cartoons of children 
in their second, third and fourth years 
(Two X Fours). The cartoons are tiea to- 
gether with copy by Kenneth F. Hall. 

Two of these cartoons are seen here' 
and they speak for themselves. Perhaps 
we should heed the injunction of Jesus 
that we become as little children in faith, 
trust and hope. Perhaps we get too far 
away from the simplicity of childhood and 
the reality of faith in a living, ever-present 
Saviour. 

If these cartoons give you a little chuck- 
le, well and good. But if they remind you 
of the fact that Jesus loves all the chil- 
dren of the world (and grown-ups too!) 
then so much the better. 

You will have peace and joy, satisfac- 
tion and security, forgiveness and eternal 
life, without stint or measure. 

The hymn writer had the answer for all 
the problems and issues of "real" life, 
when he wrote: 

"How can I be lonely, when I've Jesus 

only. 
To be my Companion, and unfailing Guide? 
How can I be weary, or my path seem 

dreary, 
When He's walking by my side?" 

•From "Two By Fours", by Charles M. 
Schuiz and Kenneth F. Hall, published by 
Warner Press, Inc., Anderson, Indiana 
46011, and used by permission. The book 
may be secured from our College Book- 
room. 






As Toronto Bible College and London College 
Bible and Missions merge to form Ontario Bible Cc 
lege, the faculties of both institutions have bee 
assigned their new areas of responsibility. The fc 
lowing pictures will make you familiar with thos 
whom you have not met before. May we sugge 
that you remove this center fold spread and use 



Margaret E. Hunter, B.A. 




ADMINISTRATION 

Stewart L. Boehmer, D.D. 
William R. Foster, B.A., Th.D. 
Andrew E. Davidson 
Douglas C. Percy 
Charles A Tipp, M.A., B.D. 
Kermit A. Ecklebarger, M.A. 
Lillian M. Scobie, B.R.E. 
Gordon W. Dorey, B.Th. 
William H. Crump 



Preside 
Academic Des 
Comptrolli 
Director of Developmei 
Assistant Director of Developmer 
Dean of Student 
Registr; 
Dean of Me 
Director of Christian Servic 
Director of Evening Scho{ 
Libraria 



FACULTY 

BIBLICAL STUDIES — Chairman, Edward L. Simmond 
M.A., B.D,; Kermit A. Ecklebarger, M.A.; John Honeyma 
B.A., Th.M; Donald A. Leggett. B.A., M.Th. 





D. C. Percy 






W. ,(; 




as a prayer reminder, particularly for this first difficult 
year of integration and expansion? The two Colleges 
are now one in physical fact. They must also be one 
in spirit, purpose and practice. As we pray and 
work, will you join us at the throne of grace? The 
future is as bright as the promises of God! 



Strimple, 



Th.M 



Gordon W. Dorey, 
iam H. Crump (and 



THEOLOGY— Chairman, Robert 

William R. Foster, B.A„ Th.D. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY— Chairman, 

B.Th.; Stewart L. Boehmer, D.D.; Wi 

Christian Education) 

MISSIONS— Chairman, William J. Wallace, B.A., M.Ed.; M. 

Murray Macleod, M.A., B.D. (and Biblical Studies); Douglas 

C. Percy. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION— Chairman, Peter Enns, M.A., 

B.D.; Lillian M. Scobie, B.R.E. 

SACRED MUSIC— Chairman. Warren E. Adams, M.Mus.; 

David Cast. B.S.M., A.R.C.T.; Elizabeth Percy, A.T.'C.M. 

GENERAL ARTS— Chairman, B. Gordon Wright, B.A., Th.M.; 

Helen J. Adams. MA.; Glen C. Taylor, B.A., B.D.; Charles A. 

Tipp, M.A.. B.D. (and Missions 

LIBRARIAN— Margaret E. Hunter, B.A. 

COLLEGE PHYSICIAN— Nelles Silverthorne, M.B. 





Africa, 
1968 



Nine years ago we had the privilege of a 
rather extensive visit to several mission 
fields in Africa. While we saw something 
of Senegal, Liberia, Ghana, Nigeria, 
Congo, Uganda, Kenya, and Egypt, our 
time was largely spent in Liberia, Nigeria, 
Congo and Kenya. The Sudan Interior 
Mission is doing a big job in Liberia and 
Nigeria, and the Africa Inland Mission has 
a great work in Congo and Kenya. 

We have just returned from another 
African safari, the main purpose of which 
was to attend the triennial meeting of the 
International Conference of the Africa In- 
land Mission. Delegates were present from 
Canada, United States, Great Britain, and 
Australia, besides members of the Central 
Field Council representing our several 
fields. 

Physically, Africa is a great continent. To 
be sure, there are desert lands, swamps 
and dense jungles that cannot yet be util- 
ized to any extent. But much the same 



could be said of our own country as we 
think of the vast northlands which to date 
are largely uninhabited and undeveloped. 
Africa, however, can boast of some of the 
most beautiful areas in the world. We saw 
gardens, estates, and general beauty that 
were as breathtaking as anything any- 
where. 

As to modern architecture and construc- 
tion, Nairobi the capital of Kenya, would 
compare quite favourably to our finest 
cities. It has a population of one-half mil- 
lion souls, and it is seething with activity. 
One main section of the city is as fine 
as anything could be, standing out perhaps 
in bolder contrast because of the poorer 
parts. 

We enjoyed a trip to "Treetops", where 
our Queen was notified of her father's 
death and succeeded to the throne. Here, 
one has the opportunity to view from a 
building up in the trees hundreds of ani- 
mals as they come to the water to drink. 
Buffalo, rhinoceri, elephants, water buck, 
bush buck, baboons, wild hogs, and the 
like, provided very fascinating entertain- 
ment. We heartily urge our readers to take 
this trip at the earliest possible moment. 
It is well worth the investment! You will 
also be challenged with the missionary 
opportunity. 

What about the people? What is the true 
story of Africa Today? Is this vast con- 
tinent open to the gospel, or are doors 
closing rapidly? Naturally, a categorical 
or a sweeping answer to such questions 
would be very unwise; in fact, quite impos- 
sible. But it can be said with certainty 
that, for the time being at least, Africa in 
large degree is still an open door. To be 
sure there are, and will continue to be 
trouble spots, such as Nigeria where the 
situation is very serious. But for the most 
part, there Is an open and effectual door 
to the gospel. 

For example, Kenya is currently one 
of the bright spots on the continent, 
largely because President Jomo Kenyatta 
is warmly disposed to the spread of the 
gospel. In fact, he is a regular listener 
to the A.I.M. radio broadcasts. Likewise 
Congo, in spite of many trials and tribu- 
lations, has settled down essentially to 
the freedom experienced before the up- 
risings. Of course, we do not know what 
a day may bring forth, but we thoroughly 
subscribe to the suggestion that "God's 
man is immortal 'till his work is done". 
The same can be said of God's work in 
general. 

There prevails a general idea that mis- 
sionary work is still quite welcome in 



Africa, provided that missionaries do not 
meddle In local politics. We believe that 
this is a reasonable demand. Unquestion- 
ably some overly zealous souls have gotten 
into serious trouble at this point. But hav- 
ing said this, it must also be pointed out 
that the African in ever-increasing measure 
wants to take charge of the missionary 
operation. He still feels the need of help, 
both financially and otherwise from his 
white brethren, but he is persuaded that 
the real direction and supervision of all re- 
ligious activity should be in his hands. We 
beleve that, ultimately, he is right. We are 
persuaded further, however, that the 
transition should be very carefully and 
prayerfully and cautiously effected, for 
much is at stake and the issues are very 
delicate. In other words, wise procedure 
will pay great dividends. Unwise decisions 
could well wreck and scuttle the pains- 
taking work of generations. Let us pray for 
Africa. 

S. L. BOEHMER 



MAILING PROBLEMS 

PLEASE READ, and if corrections must be 
made do it at once. Send us the mailing 

label as on this publication and the 
changes or corrections required. Be sure 
zone number or ZIP code (U.S.A.) is 
added. 

With the merger of L.C.B.M. and T.B.C. 
our mailing lists provided a major prob- 
lem. Many friends and supporters were on 
both lists, and these are in the process 
of being corrected. Our new mailing list 
is being computerized by General Printers, 
Oshawa, and they are as anxious as we 
to have a "clean" mailing list. 
IF you receive two mailings of any one 
publication, please send us the address 
panel to be deleted. 

IF an address is incorrect, now is the 
time to change it. Please send us the old 
label and the new, corrected address. 
IF you have friends who would be inter- 
ested in the Bible College, please send 
names and addresses in. 
IF corrections are not immediately made, 
please have patience with us. We have 
a big job here. 

Send all corrections or other mailing in- 
formation to: 
The Mailing Division 
16 Spadina Road, Toronto 4, Ontario 
Please help us to help you! 
Please help us to conserve the Lord's 
money! 



10 



WHY NOT ATTEND 
EVENING SCHOOL? 

Evening School for 1968-69 provides the 
special Evangelical Teacher Training As- 
sociation (E.T.T.A.) Advanced Certificate 
Course for Sunday School teachers and 
other . Christian workers. 

Classes begin with Registration on Sep- 
tember 10 and 12 at 7:00 p.m. There are 
2 subjects taught each Tuesday and 
Thursday Evening. Fees: $10.00 per sub- 
ject or $35.00 for any four subjects. Church 
groups or individuals are invited to enroll. 
Send for descriptive folder to 
Rev. W. H. Crump 
Director of Evening School 
16 Spadina Road, Toronto 4, Ontario 

"Study to show thyself approved unto 
God, a workman that needeth not to be 
ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of 
Truth." (2 Tim. 2:15). 



NEW COLLEGE CALENDAR 
NOW AVAILABLE 

Due to the many problems involved in the 
merger of L.C.B.M. and T.B.C., our Cur- 
riculum Calendar has been delayed. 

It is now available and will be sent in 
single copies or quantity upon request. 

Since this Calendar sets out the new, in- 
tegrated program of the new College, we 
urge all interested pastors, counsellors, 
and prospective students to secure a copy. 

Our combined 110 years of Bible Col- 
lege experience is to be found here. 

Read — pray — join 

This is the Bible College challenge of 
today! 



Leadership Training for Your Church 

The Evangelical Teacher Training Association Program 

Taught by men and women experienced in the field 



Sub/ecfs: 



OLO TESTAMENT SURVEY 

— Rev. DonaM Leggett, B.A., B.D., Th.M. 

Lew and History. This study of the books of 
Genesis through Esther will give you a sweep- 
ing overview of God's working omong men 
from the creation through the early days of His 
chosen people. 

Poetry end Prophecy. The thrilling messages 
of the books of Job through Motachi will give 
you insight into God's dealings with men. The 
study relates the messages of the great writing 
prophets to current living. 

NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY 

— Rov. Gordon Doroy, B.Th. 

This course brings unity ond chronological 
sequence to New Testoment study by skillfully 
weaving the contents of the books around a 
central theme — the Person of Christ. 

TEACHING TECHNIQUES 

— Miss union Scobie, B.R.E. 

This course shows how to successfully use 
teaching methods to communicate Biblical 
truths and apply them to life situations. The 
course presents the "■know-how" of lesson pre- 
paration and spiritually dynamic presentation. 



UNDERSTANDING CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

— Rov. W. H. Crump, B.R.E. 

To teach eiTectively you need to study ond un- 
derstand those you leoch. This help-packed 
subject gives insight info your pupils' person- 
alities, problems, experiences, interests ond 
needs. An excellent study for parents and all 
Christian teachers. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL SUCCESS 

.— Rev. W. H. Crump, B.R.E. 
How to hove a better Sunday School through 
understonding the purpose, organization and 
program of the school. The course defines 
areas of responsibility, tells how to recruit and 
retain students, how to select and use cur- 
riculum. 

Plus • • • THE BIBLE HOUR 

— Rev. Edward L. Stmmonda, MA., B.D. 

This is a course on successful Christian living. 
Why is it thaf some Christians ore better Qiris- 
tians than others? Why do some have more 
peace and joy. more success in wttnessing.. 
more victory over sin? Are there nny ways to 
overcome fear, boredom, frust.'ation, loneli- 
ness? Does God intend His people to be de- 
fected, or to be successful, in their daily lives? 
This course will be an attempt to study and 
apply these principles and methods which God 
has revealed in the Bible for the enrichment of 
the lives of His people. 



eZ^JSU^fO £^:sjeft..tf3% £S^jUL<tfx& fC^CS-^d;^ S^s^JSl^^ C^^JSl^^ C^^CiL^A e^iSJSL^^Ifb SSsJUL-^S^ «S:aijSL<£;a 



calendaia 

19(58- 
1969 



tononto 
bible college and 
london 
college of 
bible and missions 







A NEW ONE MINUTE 
THOUGHT EACH DAY 



m 



INSPIRATIONAL 
RECORDED 

MESSAGE 

920-2222 

DAY OR NIGHT 



11 




E. Cassidy 



W. Flanagan 



FIELD REPRESENTATIVES 

Mr. Elmer Cassidy and Mr. Wilson Flanagan are Field Representatives for 
the Bible College. They visit prospective students, donors and sponsors, 
maintaining these vital links between the College and constituency. They 
seek to provide spiritual ministry and encouragement to the Lord's people. 
Pray for them in their work. 

Mr. Cassidy is a graduate of L.C.B.M. and Mr. Flanagan graduated 
from T.B.C. 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 
FOR 1968 

September 3 

Arrival of New Students 

September 4-7 

New Student Orientation and Registration 

September 5 

Registration for Upperclassmen 

September 6 

Convocation and Day of Prayer 

September 7 

Welcome Banquet for New Students 

September 9 

Beginning of Classes 

September 13-15 

Faculty and Student Retreat 

September 30 - October 4 

Anniversary Conference 

October 4-5 

Alumni Homecoming 

October 14 

Thanksgiving Holiday 

November 6 

Day of Prayer 

December 6 

General Student Recital 

December 12 

Reading Day 

December 13-20 

Final Examinations 

December 21-22 

Parents' Weekend 

December 22 

Christmas IVIusicale (Toronto) 

December 22 

Beginning of Christmas Recess (after 

Musicals) 



Weekly College Prayer Hour 

For a couple of years, the College Prayer Hour has been held every Wed- 
nesday from 1 :30 - 2:30 p.m. 



Please note: 

Beginning September 11, the Prayer Hour will be held Wednesday from 
11:15 - 11:50 a.m. This will follow the weekly Chapel and be more conve- 
nient for friends as well as students to participate. If you are free, please join 
us, each Wednesday or pray for us wherever you are. If this new College is 
to do an effective work for God, there must be much prayer, which means 
more prayer warriors. Will you be one of them? 



Dormitories Purchased 

Two buildings at 24 and 26 Spadina 
Road have been purchased to make addi- 
tional dormitory space possible. 

The College got possession of the build- 
ings in mid August, and a crash refurbish- 
ing and refurnishing job was done to make 
them available for College opening. 

l\/luch will still need to be done, but the 
students will bear with the temporary ar- 
rangements. 

Our next issue will carry pictures of 
them. As we go to press one of them is a 
hippie haven and weird boutique. 

Now they will be "cleansed and sancti- 
fied" for the Lord's work. 

Be sure you see them when next you 
visit our growing campus. 



12 



ALUMNI NEWS 

Compiled by: Mrs. C. Van Duzen 
Mrs. K. Murray 



Thanksgiving (T) ALUMNI GOAL OF $30,000.00 

WENT OVER THE TOP. 

$31,073.31 was received in contributions and bequests ($5,500.00). 



ON THE HOME FRONT 

REV. NEIL REMPEL, B.Th. L'63, was or- 
dained on March 13, 1968, at Calvary 
Church, St. Catharines, Ont. 
MR. & MRS, EDWARD BAKER, B.R.E. 
L'62 (GWENETH GELLATLY, B.R.E. L'61) 
are at Kapuskasing Baptist Church where 
he is pastor. 

MR. & MRS. EARL HOLLAND, B.Th. L'65 
(INA GOULD, B.R.E. L'66) are in the 
Church at Blair, Ont. 

MR. & MRS. DAVID PYKE, B.Th. L'65 
(MARION, B.R.E. L'64) are at West Ham- 
ilton Gospel Church. 

REV. & MRS. ROBERT REDDING, L'52 
(LORRAINE BLYTHE, L'51) are at Bethel 
Baptist Church in St. Catharines, Ont. 
MR. MARVIN WARMAN, B.Th. L'65, is min- 
ister of Christian Education at the Evan- 
gelical Free Church, Turlock, Cal. 
DR. OSWALD J. SMITH, T'12, celebrates 
his Diamond Jubilee, 60 years in the min- 
istry, this year, he held city wide cam- 
paigns in Australia from mid-August to 
September 8, 1968. 

MR. & MRS. MARTYN THOMAS, T'62 
(SANDRA JORDAN, T'64) are in Keswick-, 
Ont., where he is pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Christian Church. 
MR. & MRS. WINSTON MARTIN, B.Th. T'66 
(BETTY ANN LAPP, B.Th. T'67) are in 
Stratford, Ontario, where he is pastor of 
the Avon Mennonite Church. 
REV. JOHN VERHOOG, B.A., B.D., T'62 is 
pastor of the Reformed Church in Overisel, 
Mich. Mr. Verhoog received his B.D. de- 
gree from Western Theological Seminary 
in Holland, Mich., in 1968, and was or- 
dained June 18, 1968. 
REV. & MRS. FRANK SWACKHAMMER, 
T'37, are in Sarnia, Ont., where Mr. Swack- 
hammer is pastor of Central Baptist 
Church. 

REV. FRANK W. HASKINS, E.C., B.A., 
M.A., B.Th., T'20, a veteran Baptist pastor, 
was honoured for long service to the 
Baptist denomination of Western Canada, 
at the 1968 Annual Assembly of the Bap- 
tist Union of Western Canada. 
REV. MAX VAGUE, B.Th. T'68, was ordain- 
ed on June 23, 1968, by the Conservative 
Congregational Christian Churches, in the 
Ringwood Congregational Christian Church 



where he is pastor. REV. CLARENCE 
BASS, T'36, officiated. The charge to the 
candidate was delivered by REV. D. C. 
PERCY, T'36, the ordination prayer was 
given by REV. BARRY JONES, B.Th., T'64, 
and REV. R. SERRICK, T'37, participated 
in the laying on of hands. 
REV. DOUGLAS SHERWOOD, T'57, was 
ordained into the Baptist ministry by the 
Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec 
on May 14, 1968, at Temple Baptist 
Church, Brantford, where Mr. Sherwood is 
pastor. The charge to the candidate was 
given by REV. JAMES TAYLOR, T'40; the 
charge to the church by REV. CAMERON 
ORR, T38, and PASTOR FRANK BYRNE, 
B.Th. T'63, read the scripture. 
REV. CLARENCE BASS, T'36, was elected 
President of the Conference of Congrega- 
tional Christian Churches in Ontario at the 
Annual Conference in June, 1968. 
MR. & MRS. STANLEY DESJARDINE, T'68, 
are in London, Ont., where Mr. Desjardine 
is assistant pastor of the Church of God. 
MR. WM. McNAIRN, T'66, has recently 
accepted the appointment of Business 
Manager of Welcome Hall Mission in Mont- 
real, Quebec. 

REV. ALEX McLEAN, T30, retired from the 
ministry on August 31, 1968, after 32 
years at Willowdale Presbyterian Church, 
Ontario. 

REV. JAMES FERGUSON, T'33, of St. An- 
drew's Presbyterian Church, Strattord, 
Ont., received a Centennial Medal. 

ON FURLOUGH 

MISS KATHARINE PROWSE, T'53, from 
Nigeria, Africa (S.I.M.). 
MR. & MRS. DONALD MORRIS (WINNI- 
FRED MEDHURST, T'47 E.C.) from Japan 
(O.M.F.). 

MISS YARMILA JELINEK, T'44-'46, from 
Bolivia, South America, (N.T.M.). 
REV. & MRS RUSSELL SELF, T'39 (ALICE 
GLEASON T'46) from India (C.P.F.M.B.). 
MISS BEVERLEY CLARK, T'52, from Ni- 
geria, Africa (S.I.M.) 

MISS GOLDIE BLAKENEY, T'44, from 
Nigeria, Africa (S.I.M.). 
MR. & MRS. HAROLD McMILLAN, T'39- 
'40), from Nigeria, Africa (S.I.M.). 
MISS EILEEN GREENWOOD, T'51, from 
Vellore, India (C.B.F.M.B.). 



DR. & MRS. KENNETH DRESSER, T'58 

Sp., from Indonesia (T.E.A.M.). 

MISS WIN;FRED price, L'49, from Japan 

(F.E.G.C). 

MRS. DAVID GRIFFITHS (ELAINE DAVIS, 

L'62) from Thailand (O.M.F.). 

MR. & MRS. JOHN DEKKER (HELEN 

CLOWES, undergrad L'59) from West New 

Guinea (R.B.M.U.). 

MISS STELLA TOFFLEMIRE, undergrad 

L'59, from Brazil (U.F.M.). 

MISS MARJORIE DANCE, L'51, from Ni- 
geria, West Africa, (S.I.M.). 

MISS THELMA CLARK, L'47, from Japan 

(T.E.A.M.). 

MR. & MRS. HAROLD HIDE, L'48, from 

Nigeria, West Africa, (S.I.M.). 

MISS BETTY RESIDE, L'53, from Kenya, 

East Africa (A.I.M.). 

MR. & MRS. HOWARD bRYCE, L'51 

(GEORGINA, L'50) from Nigeria, West 

Africa, (S.I.M.). 

MR. & MRS. JACK KOZIOL (VERA MUS- 

IKOV, L'43) from Korea (T.E.A.M.). 

REV. & MRS. DAVID COLE, L'57 (DINA 

REEMEYER, L'56), from Indonesia (U.F.M.). 

REV. & MRS. MELBOURNE CUTHBERT, 

L'51 (DOROTHY LEES, L'50) from Brazil 

(A.B.W.E.). 

TO THE FIELD 

MR. & MRS. CHRIS COSTERUS, T'51 
(GRACE WORLING, T'54) to Taiwan 
(C.P.F.M.B.). 

MISS ANNEMARIE HATTENHAUER, T'62, 
lo Nigeria, Africa (S.I.M.). 
MR. & MRS. EDWIN JONES, T'42-'43 to 
Ethiopia. Africa (S.I.M.). 
MISS IDA WHITE, T'49, to India (Presby- 
terian W.M.S.). 

MISS ANNE ALDRIDGE, T'66 Sp., to Sing- 
apore (O.M.F.), for her first term of ser- 
vice. 

MISS DENISE STRINGER, B.R.E. T65, to 
Nepal (B.M.M.F.), for her first term of 
service. 

MISS RUTH PATTERSON, T'48, to Congo, 
Africa (C. & M.A.). 

MISS ALICE ROWE, T'38, (A.E.F.) to 
Luampa, Zambia. 

MISS GRACE ALLISON, L'66, to Tanzania, 
E. Africa, with A.I.M. for her first term. 
MISS OLIVE BRITTAIN, B.R.E. L'53 (B. 
M.M.) returned to Assam, India. 



13 



MISS PEGGY DEGNAN, L'44 (B.M.M.) 
returned to Venezuela, S.A. 
MISS GRACE KEMP, L'56, returned to 
Moundou, Chad, Africa, under S.U.M, 
MISS MARION LANKIN, L'51, with B.M.M. , 
returned to Central Africa Republic. 
MR. & MRS. JACK McKILLOP, L'51 (DORIS 
L'52) returned to Jamaica, under B.M.M. 
MR. & MRS. CLARENCE SHELLY, L'57 
(PEARL SPARKS, L'58) are now serving 
in Lamorlaye, France, with G.E.M. 
MISS PATRICIA STYRAN, B.R.E. L'51, re- 
turned to Nigeria, W. Africa, to teach in 
the S.I.M. Medical Auxiliary Training 
School. 

MARRIAGES 

MISS BRENDA MORLEY to MR. FRANK 
BALE, L'62-'64, on March 16, 1968, at 
Central Baptist Church, London, Ont. REV. 
ROY LAWSON, L'53, officiated. MISS 
LINDA ISAAC, B.R.E. L'69, was one of the 
bridesmaids; MR. JOHN BOOKER, B.Th., 
L'69, was an usher; and MR. DON VAIR, 
L'63-68, was organist. 

MISS MARSHA OUDMAN to MR. ELLIS- 
TON BRIDGER, L'68, on May 1, 1968. 
MISS IRENE PAGE to MR. CHARLES 
PETTAPIECE, undergrad L'66, on May 10, 
1968, in the London, Ont., area. REV. 
BRUCE SCHNURR, B.Th. L'58, officiated. 
MISS FAITH WARMAN, B.R.E. L'68, to 
MR. SYNDEY PAGE, B.Th. L'67, on June 
21, 1968, in Wlllowdale Baptist Church, 
Toronto. Mr. Warren Adams, Faculty (L), 
sang, and the organist was MRS. BILL 
SMITH (LORNA HILL, L'64-66). Mr. Bill 
Smith acted as best man and was master 
of ceremonies at the reception. MISS 
JUNE HEWSON, L'65-'68, was the maid of 
honour, and the flower girl and ringbearer 
were Beth and Jonathan Leggett, children 
of Rev. Donald Leggett, Faculty (L). 
MISS JAN FARQUHARSON , undergrad 
L'67, to MR. CHARLES CONGRAM, B.R.E. 
L'68, at People's Church, Toronto, on 
June 22, 1968. Mr. Warren Adams, Faculty 
(L), was organist, and MR. RONALD UN- 
RUH, L'67, and MR. GARY EASON, B.R.E., 
L'67, sang a duet. MISS WENDY ERICS- 
SON, undergrad L'67, was a bridesmaid 
and MR. GARY CARTER, B.R.E., L'68, 
acted as usher. 

MISS JOYCE REMPEL to MR. MARVIN 
WARMAN, B.Th., L'65, on June 29, 1968, 
in Winnipeg. 

MISS WENDY ERICSSON, undergrad 
L'67, to MR. GARY CARTER, B.R.E., L'68, 
at People's Church, Toronto, on July 27, 
1968. REV. KERMIT ECKLEBARGER, Fac- 
ulty (L), officiated, while MR. & MRS. 
DAVID CAST, B.S.M., L'68, (SHARON 



WILSON, L'67) were soloist and organist, 
respectively. Among the attendants were: 
MR. IAN PERCY, T'69, best man; MR. 
BRUCE LAMBSHEAD, B.Th., L'68, and MR. 
CHARLES CONGRAM, B.R.E. L'68, ushers; 
and MRS. CHARLES CONGRAM (JAN 
FARQUHARSON, undergrad L'67) brides- 
maid. 

MISS JUNE HEWSON, L'65-68, to MR. BOB 
FURTNEY, B.R.E. L'67, on August 31, 
1968, in Kingston, Ont. MRS. SYDNEY 
PAGE (FAITH WARMAN, B.R.E. L'68) was 
matron of honour. 

MISS JOSEPHINE ROGERS. T'52, to MR. 
EDWARD GRIMSHAW on May 18, 1968, in 
Jos, Nigeria, Africa. 

MISS BETH CARSCADDEN, B.R.E. T'68, to 
MR. ROBERT COTTRILL, T'69, on June 
1, 1968, at Garside Gospel Church, Ham- 
ilton, Ont. REV. A. BARBER, L'46, offi- 
ciated, assisted by REV. G. DOREY, L'49. 
MRS. IAN GRANT (SANDRA MARTIN, T'64) 
was the soloist. MISS SHEILA BURGESS, 
T'70, was maid of honour; the bridesmaids 
were MISS LORRAINE SHELSTAD, B.R.E 
T'68, and MISS HAZEL KIRTON, T'71. MR. 
IAN PERCY, T'69, was an usher. At the 
reception, REV. WM. CRUMP T'49 was 
master of ceremonies, and a duet was 
sung by MISS LINDA NOLSON, T'64-'66 
and MRS. S. HIBBINS (WINNIE COWLING, 
T'67). 

MISS BARBARA KINCADE, B.R.E. T'67, 
to MR. PETER BLOOM, T'65, on June 8, 
1968, in Knox Presbyterian Church, Tor- 
onto. MISS FAYE MARSHALL, B.R.E. T'66, 
was maid of honour and MISS BETTY 
NUTE, T'65, and MISS PHYLLIS ORR, 
B.R.E. T'66, were bridesmaids. The soloist 
was MRS. IAN GRANT (SANDRA MARTIN, 
T'64) and MR. DOUGLAS HENRY, B.Th. 
T'65, was an usher. 

MISS DONNA WOODS to MR. BRIAN 
BREWSTER, T'67, on July 6, 1968, in 
Kampala, Uganda, Africa. 
MISS LINDA SMITH, B.R.E. T'68, to MR. 
IAN PERCY, T'69, on July 6, 1968, at 
Calvary Gospel Church, St. Catharines, 
Ont. 

REV. H. PERCY, T'39, performed the cere- 
mony assisted by DR. H. MACBAIN. DR. 
B. WIGGLESWORTH, T'69, and MRS. C. 
WILHELM B.R.E. T'68 were soloists. MR. 
PAUL PERCY, L'69, was best man. MRS. 
D. C. PERCY (BETTY WILLIS, T'35) played 
at the reception. 

MISS MARION MILLER, B.R.E. T'68, to 
MR. EDWARD VANDERMEER, T'68, on 
July 6, 1968, at Pape Avenue Baptist 
Church, Toronto. MRS. PHILIP KING 
(NANCY ROGERS, T'62) was matron of 
honour, and REV. JOHN MEENINIK, L'67, 



was best man. MRS. ROBERT COTTRILL 
(BETH CARSCADDEN, B.R.E. T'68) was 
soloist, with MISS KATHLEEN McELROY, 
B.R.E. T'68, as organist. MR. PHILIP KING, 
T'61, and MR. HARRY VANDER MOLEN, 
T'66-'68, were ushers. 
MISS ELFI LUTHER, T'66 E.C., to MR. 
JACK LOCKERBY, on June 29, 1968, at 
Knox Presbyterian Church, Toronto. 

BIRTHS 

To MR. & MRS. VITO BOOTH, T'64, a son, 
SCOTT HOWARD, on October 17, 1967, 
in Huntsville, Ont. 

To MR. & MRS. NORMAN BULLOCK, B.Th. 
T'63 (MARILYN INKSTER, T'58) a son, 
JEREMY DOUGLAS, on May 10, 1968, in 
Hamilton, Ont., a brother for JASON and 
SCOTT. 

To REV. & MRS. GORDON HISCOX, B.Th. 
T'65 (MARILYN McGILL, T'64) a son, DA- 
VID GORDON, on May 16. 1968. 
To REV. & MRS. LAIRD CHRISTIE, B.Th. 
T'60 (SYLVIA HINES, T'62) a son, JOHN 
ALLEN, on May 24, 1968, in Toronto. 
To REV. & MRS. GORDON GOODERHAM, 
T'60 (JOAN STEWART, T'59) a son, JEFF- 
ERSON DAVID, on June 25, 1968, in Stouff- 
ville, Ont., a brother for DEREK, LAUREN, 
SANDRA, CHRISTIE and JOEL. 
To MR. & MRS. INER ROBINSON, T'55 
(CARMEN MALCOLM, T'55) a son, JOEL, 
on April 28, 1968, in Jos, Nigeria, Africa. 
To MR. & MRS. KENNETH MILLER 
(FRANCES QUINNELL, T'51) a son KEVIN 
TIMOTHY, on April 30, 1968, in Mbabane, 
South Africa. 

To MR. & MRS. BOB LAWRENCE, assoc. 
L'65 (PAT SN;DER, B.Th. L'66) a son, 
BRADLEY DAVID, on April 6, 1968. 
To MR. & MRS. GLEN LORCH (LORALYN 
TURNER, L'67) a daughter, LORIANN, on 
April 26, 1968. 

To MR. & MRS. JACK HAWKINS, under- 
grad L'66 (ESTHER FUNE, undergrad L'66) 
a son, STEPHEN JOHN, on May 24, 1968. 
To MR. & MRS CLINTON NEWMAN, un- 
dergrad L'68 (ANNEKE, assoc. L'68), a 
daughter, REBECCA ANN, on June 1, 1968, 
in Fort Erie. 

To MR. & MRS. DAVID CAST, B.S.M. L'68 
(SHARON WILSON L'67) a son ROBERT 
LOREN, on June 24, 1968, in Orillia. 

DEATHS 

REV. F. X. STANLEY, T'08, for 55 years a 
missionary with the S.I.M. in Nigeria. He 
died suddenly in Toronto, August 1, 1968. 
MISS VIOLET GARTLY, T'36, on June 26, 
1968, in London, Ont. 



14 



Alumni Anniversary Conference 

To commemorate 110 years of Christian service, (T.B.C. 75 years; 
L.C.B.M. 35 years) the joint Alumni Associations are sponsoring a 

One Week Anniversary Conference 

September 30 - October 5, 1968 

SPECIAL SPEAKERS: 

DR. W. NIGEL KERR, 
Gordon Divinity School, Boston, Mass. 

REV. LEITH SAMUEL 
London, England 

DR. W. STANFORD REID 
University of Guelph, Ontario 

SPECIAL MUSIC 

ALL Alumni and Friends are urged to attend 
as many sessions as possible. 

ALUMNI 

Be sure to reserve SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 for your HOMECOMING! 

Meet old and new friends; enjoy the rich fellowship 

you know so well. 

Watch For Special Bulletin 

Make Your Banquet Reservation Early — $3.75 each 



Conference Schedule 



THEME: "FAITHFUL IS HE ... HE ALSO WILL DO IT" (1 Thess. 5:24) 

Mon. Sept. 30 Tues. Oct. 1 Wed. Oct. 2 Thurs. Oct. 3 Fri. Oct. 4 Sat. Oct. 5 



College 












ALUMNI 


10:35 A.M. 


Dr. N. Kerr 


L. Samuel 


N. Kerr 


L. Samuel 


N. Kerr 


HOMECOMING 
BANQUET 

in the 














Executive Dining 


College 












Hall 


1:15 P.M. 


Rev. L. Samuel 


N. Kerr 


L. Samuel 


N. Kerr 


L. Samuel 


Queen Elizabeth 

Building, C.N.E. 

6:00 P.M. 

SPEAKER: 














Knox 

Presbyterian 
Church 


Rev. L. Samuel 


N. Kerr 


L. Samuel 


N. Kerr 


L. Samuel 


Dr. W. Stanford 
Reid 


8:00 P.M. 












Special Music 
Price $3.75 each 
FREE PARKING 



All Friends Are Welcome At All Sessions. 



15 



Books from the TBC Bookroom 



•'Of the making of books tfiere is no end" 
wrote tfie wise man, and it is for our good 
and profit tfiat Christian writers continue to 
speak through their writings. 

The College Bookroom carries hundreds 
of volumes that cover many areas of in- 
terest to Christian people; biographies, 
commentaries, novels, theology. Christian 
Education, missions, pastoral helps. Bibles, 
New Testaments and many modern ver- 
sions of the Scriptures. 

Why not drop in and browse, or phone 
or write in your orders? We can secure 
any book or publication on the market. We 
are here to serve you. 

The following are some recently published 
books of interest: 

THE INESCAPABLE CALLING, by R. Ken- 
neth Strachan, 
Eerdman's Publishing House, Price 1.80. 



This is the first book of a new series: 
"Ministries in Missions." It is fitting that the 
first should be the posthumous work of the 
outstanding leader of the Latin America 
Mission. 

ALL LOVES EXCELLING, by R. Pierce 
Beaver, 

Eerdman's Publishing House, Price $3.25. 
The first volume of a series: "Women 
in Missions." Here is some interesting re- 
search on the parts women have played 
in Missions. 

THE GREAT LIGHT, by James Atkinson 
Eerdman's Publishing House, Price $5.50 
Vol. 4 of The Advance of Christianity 
Through the Centuries. It covers Luther and 
the Reformation. 

THE PATTERN OF NEW TESTAMENT 
TRUTH by George E. Ladd 



Eerdman's Publishing House, Price $4.15 
Dr. Ladd of Fuller Theological Seminary 
brings again in this volume the truth of 
the unity of the New Testament. 

THE REALITY OF FAITH, by H. M. Kuitert 
Eerdman's Publishing House, Price $6.00 
A book for Bible and theology students 
by the professor of Ethics at the Free Uni- 
versity in Amsterdam. 

HIDDEN VALLEY, by Douglas C. Percy 
Zondervan Publishing House, Price $1.05 
Mr. Percy's novel of missionary work in 
Nigeria has now been issued in paper- 
back. Other novels (and sequels to Hid- 
den Valley) available, are BEYOND THE 
TANGLED MOUNTA'N and FLIGHT to 
GLORY. 



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